Lightning sailors round the upwind mark. Severn Sailing Association
Laser Frostbite  



The 2013/2014 Frostbite Racing will be divided into two series, November 17, 2013 through January 12, 2014, and January 19, 2014 through March 16, 2014. Series 1 consists of eight (8) race days. Series 2 also consists of eight (8) race days beginning on January 19.
Competitors must use the same sail number throughout both series.

Sails without numbers are not permitted.

DATES: The series will take place on the following Sundays:
Series 1 - Nov 17, Nov 24, Dec 1, Dec 8, Dec 15, Dec 22, Jan 5, Jan 12.
Series 2 - Jan 19, Feb 2, Feb 9, Feb 16, Feb 23, March 2, March 9, and March 16.

Every participant in the 2013/2014 frostbite series is responsible for serving at least 2 days on the race committee (one during each series).

There are 5 slots available for each day, Signal Boat 1, Signal Boat 2, Signal Boat 3, Safety Boat 1 and Safety Boat 2. Only SSA members are eligible to sign up for Signal Boat 1 and Safety Boat 1 slots. Any registered user can sign up for the other three slots. The Signal Boat 3 Slot may be reassigned to the safety boat at the discretion of the PRO, so whoever igns up for this slot should bring a dry suit and be prepared to go in the water.

To sign up for a particular day, Log in to this site, then click on the "Frostbite RC" tab. Click on the "Sign Up" link next to the day on which you want to sign up. Then click "Sign Up" next to the slot for which you want to sign up.
 

If you are a member of SSA and are having trouble signing up for one of the members-only slots, send an e-mail to the SSA office and we will make sure the system recognizes you as a member.

The regular entry fee is: $180.00
If you are a member of Severn Sailing Association, there is no entry fee.
Regatta Documents
List of Entries
Enter the Regatta
Update your existing entry
Regatta Results

Winner's Comments  
Leo

Hi everyone,

 

It has been great sailing this winter.  There wasn’t a lot of opportunity to sail in the winter when I was sailing Opti’s. 

This weekend there were five competitors in the radial fleet.  I feel as though I have gotten used to some of my competitors tactics and strategies.  The water right off of SSA can be tricky to sail in when the wind is light and shifty, however, the current did not seem that strong this weekend. 

I worked to try to connect the puffs by tacking on the shifts.  My friend Connor was making me work hard to stay up front.  In the first race the start was good and I sailed to the pressure up the middle.  At the windward mark I let out my sail and headed down wind and sailed by the lee for most of the day. 

The finishes were very  

16 March - Last Frostbite of Season
Very interesting day!  5-10 Knots out of the North.  Shift and puffy!
The key to success this day was consistency and that was achieved by staying in tune with the wind… and a little good luck - I certainly had my share this day.  No matter where you started, you had to look around and see what the wind was doing to the fleet and capitalize on where the next puff / shift was coming from.  Downwind, the often meant chasing the followers as they showed where the puff was coming from.  And upwind, well… luck of picking the right side helped, but regardless looking upwind to anticipate the next shift was key!

Kudos to the RC team for packing in 9 races and minimal wait time in between races.  They raised the bar on managing a frostbite day.  I don't think we got to utilize the 3 minute justice, but I certainly heard some chatter about it. Perhaps next year this process, coupled with an evening rules discussion, can lay the foundation for better racing and less frustration (yelling) on the race course.

Congrats two new dads, JR Maxwell and Chris Brady (did I miss any?!?)
Congrats to Luke for winning the Series.

Look forward to seeing you all on the racecourse!
Warm regards on this snowy day after the last day of frostbiting,
Gavin OHare  
Series 2, Day 7, March 9

Probably the best day of frostbiting that we have had this year!  12-18 knots from the NNW, not really cold, and some sun, I’m really sorry for those who missed it. The good wind made it fun, but I felt like it wasn’t so windy that people were out of control very often.  There were capsizes, but mostly in the large gusts. The wind was shifty and puffy, the current was supposed to ebb strongly but I didn’t really notice it.  The average wind was steady so the RC was able to manage 8 races of perfect length.  Gavin and Michael had video from the safety boat so hopefully we will have good viewing material!

Only one more week left in the frostbite season, and then we have to start planning for warm weather.  So let’s get out there one more time for next Sunday’s racing.

  read more...
Test
abcsdddd   read more...
Series 2 Day 6, 3/2/14 - Full Rig, Jack Field
A shifty, puffy northeasterly and great competition brought a challenging week where consistency was hard to come by. Thanks to the RC for getting in 6 great races. It was great to see lots of boats out, and hopefully there will be even more for the final two weeks of the series now that there's no more ice to contend with.   read more...
Series 2 Laser Full Rig - Feb 23

Hi! My name is Connor Bayless and this is my first writing to the frostbiters.  Sunday February 23rd was my first full-rig frostbite weekend and it happened to be a beautiful day.  The wind was very light in the beginning but slowly built, and the air temperature was a shocking 55 degrees.  For people who don't know me, I'm a Freshman at Severn School.  I sail Laser Radial /C 420 sailor and I raced one year in the Opti.  I began sailing Lasers last summer-2013, high school C420 sailing in the fall, and of course sailing with you guys-ladies this winter.

The conditions on 2/23/14 were light and flat.  For our first race (not including the abandoned one), I noticed that port tack was favored.  I thought about starting at the favored end, but it was too crowded so I started by the boat and I immediately tacked to port and sped away from the fleet.  At 140 lbs, I am probably one of the lightest people in the fleet, so I tightened my controls to point.  I believe everyone could do the same because of the flat water.  Downwind - I was fast because I am light and I eased all my controls all the way off except for my vang. My vang was tightened so the leech could do small flicks to propel me forward.

It was a great day. If the wind is light enough I'll see you full riggers again!  Thanks for welcoming me to the full rig fleet!

Connor Bayless

 
Series 2, Day 4 writeup
It was a day of surprises for frostbites.  We expected the ice to be clear since the wind was up last night, but that was not the case....  The race committee may have used "grappling hooks" to haul ice out of the basin before racing.  Thanks to everyone who worked to make sailing happen today!

The forecast was generally 5-10 from the West-NW today, so it was a surprise when we got something rather different.  Wind from the East had been fighting the predicted light West wind, leading to some confused wind.  As the RC prepared to set the course, a reasonable East wind filled in, allowing us to complete 6 races, despite a late start (great work RC).  

The wind was about 6-9 from the East and later ENE, maybe a little less at the end of the day, with a solid amount of current flooding, roughly aligned with the wind axis.
  read more...
Laser Series 2 day 2 - 9 Feb
What a day.  I thought it was going to be mild and calm, but wow, COLD and ended up hiking the last couple of races.  Fierce competition out there.  Thanks guys.  Jerry, Congrats on the bullet race 6 today!

If there was any secret sauce today, I thought it was keeping my hands warm and ability to handle the boat.
I balled my fingers into a fist inside one of my gloves downwind to regain heat in my fingers for the final beat.   even brought out a second pair of gloves for between races, but did not have time to put them on.  Nice job, RC!

I liked the pin start and used my port approach about a couple of boat lengths below the line to ensure that I could tack in and lee bow and still corral starboard tackers above me.  It seemed to work well today.  

Downwind, I tried to rock and roll with the waves and surf to gain ground downwind.  It usually paid for me.

On the final beat, it seemed to be a parade to the finish so when I had lots to gain and nothing to lose (gap behind me) I tacked out and got lucky a couple of times and beat guys who were following the parade to the right.  

Enjoyed getting cold in the parking lot and warming up in the hot top at my place after sailing.
Warm regards to you all, 
Gavin - 92  
Leo is Frozen

Hi everyone,

I thought last weekend was much colder the previous weeks.  I had ice in my boat when I got to the club.  UGH. 

The wind was coming out of the SW shifting to the W.  I would have thought that a SW breeze would have brought up some warmer air.  I guess not.  The winds were approaching the high teens in the puffs and the low single digits in the lulls.  

I was having a terrible time anticipating the puffs and being ready to adjust your controls with ice cold hands.  

I was happy to see a lot of younger sailors in the radial fleet.  I knew it was going to be a tuff day. 

The start of the first race was very tight.  At the horn it seemed like everyon  

19 January
What a day!?! When I rigged my boat, I thought light to medium breeze and flooding in current as the water level was pretty low on marina bulkhead… The wind was shifty out of the South West and puffy (7-15 knots). I never won a race, but was always top 3… I guess consistency paid this day. I started at the boat all afternoon and usually worked the right side. This was to be able to tack out when I wanted. With a good start and my head looking upwind, playing the shifts on the first beat helped my consistency factor. Downwind, I managed to stay upright. When I saw puff, coming, I trimmed vang and was prepared to trim main and lower my board to counter deathroll. It worked, but because I was conservative, I don't think I gained many boats downwind. Final beat… I tried to take advantage of incoming current and stay right unless looking upwind for incoming puffs told me otherwise. Fun, challenging day. Enjoyed it. Gavin - USNA 1992   read more...
19 January
What a day!?!
When I rigged my boat, I thought light to medium breeze and flooding in current as the water level was pretty low on marina bulkhead… The wind was shifty out of the South West and puffy (7-15 knots).  

I never won a race, but was always top 3… I guess consistency paid this day.  I started at the boat all afternoon and usually worked the right side.  This was to be able to tack out when I wanted.  With a good start and my head looking upwind, playing the shifts on the first beat helped my consistency factor.  

Downwind, I managed to stay upright.  When I saw puff, coming, I trimmed vang and was prepared to trim main and lower my board to counter deathroll.  It worked, but because I was conservative, I don't think I gained many boats downwind.  

Final beat… I tried to take advantage of incoming current and stay right unless looking upwind for incoming puffs told me otherwise.  

Fun, challenging day.  Enjoyed it.
Gavin - USNA 1992  
19 January
What a day!?!
When I rigged my boat, I thought light to medium breeze and flooding in current as the water level was pretty low on marina bulkhead… The wind was shifty out of the South West and puffy (7-15 knots).  

I never won a race, but was always top 3… I guess consistency paid this day.  I started at the boat all afternoon and usually worked the right side.  This was to be able to tack out when I wanted.  With a good start and my head looking upwind, playing the shifts on the first beat helped my consistency factor.  

Downwind, I managed to stay upright.  When I saw puff, coming, I trimmed vang and was prepared to trim main and lower my board to counter deathroll.  It worked, but because I was conservative, I don't think I gained many boats downwind.  

Final beat… I tried to take advantage of incoming current and stay right unless looking upwind for incoming puffs told me otherwise.  

Fun, challenging day.  Enjoyed it.
Gavin - USNA 1992  
Day 8, Leo Boucher

Hi everyone… This is Leo Boucher.  Sorry it took so long for me to make a post this week.  My dad dropped his computer and broke the screen.

It was great to be out on the water last Sunday.  I had been sick with a cold for a few days and my Dad would not let me sail until I was better.  It was bright, sunny, and warm. 

I thought the wind was great.  It was blowing 10 to 15 knots from the NW shifting SW.  During the first race the wind was mostly right, however; after that I noticed the wind was mostly left.

I had to hike hard to keep my boat flat and fast when the wind picked up and during gusts. 

During the last race two of my competitors thought my strategy at the leeward mark was exciting. 

It looks like we will have a good day of racing this Sunday.  See you all

Day 8- Full Rig
Sunny puffy shifty day- WNW 5 to 20 kts. It was the quintessential Annapolis frostbite day. I have sailed on days like this many times and it is always a little different, but mostly the same. The breeze was coming down the river and out of the harbor and I tend to protect the left side upwind. The boat was mostly favored, and I started a few boats away from it so I could get to left shift first. It wasn't always a left shift, but not getting jammed up at the favored end was more important. After getting off the line, I just tried to see where the next shift was and tack on the edge of it.  Downwind I tired to stay on the breezy side of the rhum line which seemed to vary from race to race.

Boat wise, I started with a very loose vang to keep under control and not get pushed over the line early. After the start I would tighten it up. Given the puffy conditions, I felt like I spent the most of the day with the incorrect sail trim. Given my weight, I could keep the outhaul eased a bit more than most and then used the vang to control the shape and with lots of cunningham most of the time. This also seemed to help get through the lulls of which there were many. Downwind, I would ease everything until I got scared and then I put the board down a little and pull on the vang a bit. Thanks to the Luke and the rest of the RC. It was a hard day not to be sailing.

 
Day 7 Full Rig Winner's report
from Luke Shingledecker, day 7 full rig report.
  read more...
Day 6 Full Rig
Luke Shingledecker   read more...
Day 6 - Radial

For all of you that got scared by the forecast and the driving rain earlier in the day, you missed a great day of sailing!  We arrived at SSA and there was absolutely no wind and low fog over the water.  By start time, the fog was clearing and we still had some rain/drizzle.  The breeze filled in to a steady 10 to 12 knots.  The air temp was in the mid 60's and it was great to be frostbite sailing with comfortable hands and feet.  The clouds parted and we had a dry, overcast day with small patches of blue sky.  It really was a great day!

The wind seemed to be shifting to the right the first several races, so I planned to start near the boat and go right.  My starts were pretty good and with speed off the line I was able to pull away from the windward boat and tack to stay to the right of the fleet.  There was some significant chop, so it took some work to keep the bow from digging into the waves and filling the cockpit.  I nose dived into a couple of waves, and getting a cockpit full of water is always slow.   Downwind I tried to work the puffs and surf the waves.  I was working on the S curves by reaching up over the waves in front of me and turning down by the lee driving down the wave. 

The later races there seemed to be more pressure on the left side of the course.  I was able to catch some fresher breeze over there and cross the fleet just short of the port tack layline.  Again, I think keeping the boat flat and bow out of the waves was essential for boat speed.  My overall philosophy for the day was speed off the line, get in front and stay in front.  The fleet was a little thin, I guess due to the weather forecast and upcoming holiday.  Oh, and the speed demon, Leo Boucher, was on race committee!  Looking forward to seeing you all in the new year!  Merry Christmas everyone:)

D  

Leo Boucher

It’s Leo Boucher again.  I had a great time sailing last Sunday.  It was windy.  I really like a westerly breeze. 

During the first radial race the breeze was consistent, however, at the last minute it got gusty and shifted right.  I had a good start.  I was able to get my speed up quickly because despite the wind and gusty conditions the water was pretty flat.

Rounding the leeward mark on the first race, I was neck and neck with Jake Vickers.  As Jake was rounding the mark there was a sudden gust and Jake’s vang broke.  That was too bad.  I like racing with Jake. 

The weather forecast for this weekend looks nice and warm.  I will be helping out with the race committee this weekend.  It will be my first time.  I hope to learn a lot.

Sail fast.

I look forward to seeing you all out there this weekend.

Leo Boucher

 
Day 5 - Full Rig, Jack Field
Well it looks like I've found my ideal conditions. Day 5 brought a gusty, shifty northwesterly, averaging around 12-20 and gusting to 22-30 on the Eastport YC station. Thanks to the RC for getting off 6 great races.

The left side on the first beat paid off in nearly every race, as most shifts and puffs came from the top-left of the course. I tried to balance getting to the left side while taking advantage of the shifts for small gains. For upwind settings, I had my outhaul pretty cranked (my sail is a bit stretched out, so I was nearly two-blocked - I was tightening to the point just before it creates a real shelf in the foot) and the cunningham set to take out most of the wrinkles. For the vang, I tended to trim in two-blocked, take the slack out of the vang, then pull on about another foot. I was basically setting it so I could still get under the boom - my back was brushing the boom on the tacks. I had the main two-blocked most of the day, but ready to ease in a puff or a lift to keep the boat flat. In the lulls I tried to make sure to ease the controls to keep my power up.

I made out on several of the downwinds by keeping an eye behind me for puffs. In the races that got light on the downwind I sailed extra distance to try to connect to the next puff. Before the puff came I stabilized the boat by having my back knee on the bottom of the cockpit (may not be necessary for all, but my legs are too long to stay on my feet) while sitting just on the edge of the cockpit. I kept on enough vang to keep the boom down and I think I kept the main trimmed more than most in the puffs (definitely less than 90 degrees), which helped keep me upright. As Luke mentioned after racing, the boat is generally more stable on either a slight reach or by the lee instead of DDW. At the leeward mark I typically didn't put my vang back on until after rounding to avoid letting the boom hit the water on the gybe.
Day 4- Radial Rig, Dorian Haldeman
It seems a little weird writing this since I was not the fastest boat on the race course. But due to a scoring technicality, it appears I am the winner. It was a chilly and icy day with a light breeze. I thought early in the day the right-hand side of the course was favored with a little more pressure and a right-hand phase. My plan was to start the boat and go right. The plan didn't work so well the first race but did put me in the second or third place for the next two races. For the last race I change the plan. Looking at upwind at the standard rigs, it appeared there was more breeze on the left and a left hand shift. I started at the pin and went left, ending up first to the windward mark by a few boat length. I was a bit surprised I managed to stay ahead for the rest of the race. Speed tips for the day- I spent a lot of time in between races scraping slush and snow off my boat. That stuff adds quite a bit of weight and I'm already 30 to 45 pounds heavier than everyone else in the fleet! There is also a light wind trick in the radial I learned in a clinic several years ago. I vang on significantly and ease the mainsheet by 8 to 10 inches. You can tell if you have enough vang on by looking back at the mainsheet coming off traveler block. It should be at about 45° . Thanks for the race committee for standing out in the ice and snow. It was a fun day! It would've been nice to have a bit more breeze, but I'm sure hiking conditions with that snow and sleet pelting our faces would have been much less pleasant!  
Day 4- Standard Rig, Brian Fishbeck
A chilly snowy N/NE 4 to 6 kt day. Big shifts and velocity changes. I tried to make sure I started at the favored end, by waiting at the middle of the line and checking the breeze (head to wind) at the latest possible minute. The breeze was oscillating, so I tried to stay on the favored tack and away from the corners up wind. Down wind, same deal, but looked for lanes of breeze coming down. I got caught in a snow globe confusion a few times and found myself headed away from the mark.

Following Gavin's advice, I worked at keeping the boom close to 90 degrees to the boat down wind and that seems to help my speed. Due to the shifts, the line was sometimes heavily favored, so I made sure my vang was eased so I would not be driven across early as I was jockeying for position. Thanks to the RC.

Bryan

 
Day 3, Full Rig, Gavin OHare
Today was a lot of fun.  Brian, Susan, and Bill provided some challenging racing!  
We all had a few good races, but I was able to keep my finishes consistent and that was my strength.

The winds were 5-7 knots from SE with current going out early in the afternoon.  For me, consistency was staying right early and avoiding the current.  I also tried to keep my head out of the boat to avoid confrontations with big boat and understanding when I was actually in the puffs and waiting to make my move then.  I did not feel exceptionally fast upwind, but tried to capitalize on tactical situations and minimize the loss when my positioning was not good by tacking away and leveraging the next convergence.  

Downwind seemed to work well for me all races.  I tried to stay heeled to windward and boom out slightly past perpendicular, with the outhaul about 12 inches loose from the mid section of the boom.  When I felt a puff, I would use it go even lower on the run and then come back up when stalling.  

I checked the line for current and wind direction before each start and noticed the pin was favored and the adverse current had stalled for the last start.  Brian and I were at the  pin, and I am sure it helped our windward mark positioning for the last race.

I enjoyed the day.  Thanks to you all.
 
Day 1 Radial Winner, Leo Boucher

My name is Leo Boucher.  I have been asked to write a little something about frostbiting last week.  I thought I would start by letting you know a little bit about myself.

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Day 1 Full Rig Winner, Gavin OHare

Racing last Sunday was tee'd up to be great.   Lots of sailors, wind was about 7 knots out of the East and current seemed to be flooding at 1pm.

  read more...

2013-14 Frostbite Race Committee Assignments  
 Name Date(s) Volunteer
Laser Frostbite, Day 1, Series 1 November 17 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 2, Series 1 November 24 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 3, Series 1 December 01 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 4, Series 1 December 08 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 5, Series 1 December 15 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 6, Series 1 December 22 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 7, Series 1 January 05 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 8, Series 1 January 12 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 1, Series 2 January 19 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 2, Series 2 February 02 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 3, Series 2 February 09 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 4, Series 2 February 16 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 5, Series 2 February 23 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 6, Series 2 March 02 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 7, Series 2 March 09 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up
Laser Frostbite, Day 8, Series 2 March 16 Too late to sign up. Click here to see who signed up

News  
Series 2 Final results
Series 2, Day 8 results are posted, along with the Series 2 Final results.  Note that the series 2 cumulative results included everyone who registered, but the final results only include those who signed up for RC in the second series, and sailed at least 4 days (where the fourth day was RC duty if necessary).  
Three Minute Justice

Laser Frostbite Sailors

I am back from spending a great month on the Big Island.  Contrary to rumours it wasn’t all fun and games.  I was doing a little bit of work too.  My first Sunday back was not exactly spring like.  It started out nice enough, but the storm front rolling in (which would eventually drop half a foot of snow on our heads) began as a cold rain during the last race.  As I was on Race Committee duty I was able to see a lot of the action on the course.  One of the things I noticed was more frequent rule infractions that were not being recognized by the perpetrators (no names) and fewer turns being made when rules were broken.  In fairness to those of you that do recognize when you have fouled someone, I did see some competitors doing turns when they hit a mark or fouled a boat.  Our sport is basically self-regulated, kind of like golf.  It is a sport that relies on the integrity and sense of fair play of the competitors.  We don’t need no stinkin’ refs!  But, we do need some means of settling rule infraction disputes.  That’s what a Protest Committee is for but, frankly, we don’t have the resources or time for that.  But, we do have the “Three Minute Justice” system and we will be trying it out for the last two Frostbite Race Days.  Take a look at the following description and, if you have an issue with another competitor let’s give it a try.  To me it looks a lot simpler than the usual Protest procedure and it will keep us on our toes for the upcoming sailing season.  Mahalo.

Steve Cofer
Fleet Captain
  read more...
Series 2, Day 3 and 4 Summary
Not the easiest conditions this week and last week!  Cold and ice cannot stop Laser frostbiting (OK they can, they just didn't these weeks).  No radials, but Gavin O'Hard won on February 9, Luke Shingledecker won on February 16.  If you stayed home, you missed some good times and cold extremities.  
Series 2, Day 1 Results Posted
Beautiful day for sailing before the cold rolls back in to town. Gavin OHare won the day in the full rigs while Leo Boucher won the day in a the radials.  
Series 1, Day 8 and Final Results Posted
The Day 8 and Final Results are posted. Congrats to Luke Shingledecker, who won by .3 points over Gavin OHare and Leo Boucher, who won by a single point over Dorian Haldeman in the Radials. The Cumulative results show everyone who registered. The Final Results include only the 18 full rigs and the 4 Radials who managed to sail at least 4 days, one of which could include a race committee day. The redress points were rounded to the nearest tenth of a point. Bryan Fishback and Leo Boucher won the day.  
Frostbite RC Duty Days
While we only have one more day left in the first Frostbite Series there are sailors who have not served a day on Race Committee.  Everyone is required to serve one day for each of the two series.  You will get redress for the day that you serve.  The scoring program is not working properly right now which may be causing some incorrect scores.  This will be corrected, I promise.  Next series we will do this at the end of the series to avoid confusion.

A note on scoring.  I typically take a picture of these and send  them to John Gebhardt for posting.  It will help immensely if the scores are recorded neatly and on the score sheets provided.  These sheets are numbered to aid in calculating scores and have separate columns for each race.  How convenient!  Thanks.

Haven't figured out how to deal with the sailors who do not serve on RC.  I am open to suggestions from the fleet.
 
Day 7 Results Posted
On a day that started out windless, but turned out pretty nice, Luke Shingledecker and Dorian Haldeman ruled the day. Luke is now tied on points with Gavin OHare for the series lead, and Dorian kept her edge for the series, edging out Sandy for the day by a point, winning the last race of the day.  
Day 6 Results Posted
On a glorious summer day, Luke won the full rigs and Dorian won the Radials.  
Day 5 Results Posted
Jack Fields won the Full Rig and Leo Boucher won the Radials in chilly and blustery 15-30 knot northwesterly.

If you sailed without sail numbers or sailed a radial in the Full Rig fleet or sailed a radial in the Radial fleet but were registered in the Full Rig fleet you were not scored.
 
Holiday Party
The Laser Fleet 10 Holiday Party will be held on the 4th of January at the SSA clubhouse.  An invitation with all the details will be sent out soon.

Cofer
 
Date change and new RC slot
The Jan 26th date has been moved to Feb 2 to accommodate the IC Midwinter regatta. Also, a new race committee slot (Signal Boat 3) has been added for the remainder of Series 1 and Series 2. Whoever signs up for the Signal Boat 3 slot may be reassigned to the safety boat at the discretion of the PRO, so if you sign up for this slot you should bring a dry suit and be prepared to go in the water.  
Sail Numbers
Remember that all boats must have sail numbers.  We have been forgiving for the first few weeks but, now the hammer comes down, you won't be scored if you don't have a proper number on your sail.  Also, the sail number must match the number you enter on your registration for the series.  Cofer  
Results for Day 4 posted
Brian Fishback and Dorian Haldeman were the winners on a day with every type of precipitation known to man. Snow, sleet, freezing rain, and rain made for some real frostbiting. Look for their writeups at the bottom of the page under "Winners Comments". Two boats (1214 and 2814) were not scored as we have no record that they registered.   
Results for Series 1, Day 3 Posted
Results for Day 3 and cumulative results for Day 3 (Dec 1) are finally posted. Sorry for the delay, but sail number changes (no sail numbers) and class changes caused major delays. We trust this foolishness will settle down and scoring will be easier in the future. Once entered you cannot change classes. New entries are welcome and sail number changes are allowed.  
No Racing on Day 2

The temperature didn’t get much above 30 degrees yesterday.  We had a solid 30 with gusts to 40 at Thomas Point. When the wind speed gets close to the temperature, not good. Brrrrrrr!!!!

 
Results for Series 1, Day 1 Posted
Gavin OHare won the Full Rigs, Leo Boucher won the Radials. We left the rest of the entrants on the results for this week to indicate those who may have sailed, but didn't have sail numbers known to the RC. If your sail number is listed as "Sail number" please update your entry with your actual sail number. If you haven't registered yet, please do.  


Severn Sailing Association
311 First Street . Annapolis, Maryland 21403 . (410) 268-8744 . fax (410) 269-6832